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How to Become a Government Contractor

Once someone has accumulated the experience and knowledge in contracting, it may be time to consider how to become a government contractor. Dealing with the government is entirely different than normal civilian contracting jobs. Often, the entire process of obtaining a contract with the government takes much longer than usual. It is important to consider that bigger companies with much more experience will be bidding for the same jobs. This is why it pays to be as prepared and organized as possible. The upside is that working as a government contractor can be lucrative once the door has opened.

Decide at What Level to Bid as a General Contractor

Work practices, qualifications and pay may differ depending on whether bids are placed on local, state, or federal general contracting positions. Often, it is wise to begin at the local municipal level. This gives the contractor the opportunity to make contacts, paving the way for bigger opportunities. Experience at the local level also prepares a newer government contractor how to best plan and execute bids against bigger companies with more experience workers.

What Qualifications do Different Agencies need in a General Contractor?

Within the government, there are a multitude of agencies which require the services of a general contractor. It is practical and time saving to do a little research ahead of time to find the qualifications necessary in each state. All states require that the applicant be at least 18 years of age and eligible to work in the United States. Each state has a web portal which explains in detail what is needed to become a general contractor.

General Contracting Bids

A contractor planning to bid for a job would do well to perform a little research into the agency placing the post. Finding out who originated the Request for Proposals (RFP), and how they want to be contacted can be a very helpful edge when bidding for each job. In fact, finding out as much as possible about the workings of government job proposals allows the government contractor to act more quickly and appear more knowledgeable to the person doing the hiring.

The Government Contractor should have a Strategy

Preplanning can mean the difference between success and failure when bidding for government jobs. A plan which includes face to face meetings, bid proposals, and important information about the government contractor shows initiative and drive. Like most employers, the government likes applicants who are knowledgeable and eager for the job. It also shows a lot of confidence, which is always a plus when bidding on proposals.

A government contractor should be well prepared, confident, and honest about their qualifications, and be able to network. Even contacts made during a bid which is rejected may prove to be helpful later. The better a contractor understands the what, who, why, where and how, tends to be the one who wins the most bids.